ROI By FJR:Serious About Work

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R.O.I. By Frank J. Rich
Serious About Work
August 17, 2012

So many interviewers make this issue the primary goal in determining the suitability of candidates. The post interview summary often sounds like this: “Likeable, easy going, good skills, but talks in the first person singular too much to be a team player or; he has a spotty work experience.” Is it because he’s not serious about his work?

 

When in talks with employees do you have the view that they are doing all they can do to achieve “agreed upon” goals? If not, what do you conclude? Is it taking responsibility for the “complete” task” that’s missing? Enterprise organizations need the best from stakeholders every day. When disengaged — 54 percent of employees — the meaning and the joy in work are hard to find. Un-invested employees are indifferent about the work they do and the value of it to them. It’s a common concern since roughly 85 percent of the workforce dislikes their jobs.

 

Least resistance oriented, most people find their lowest level of contribution — just enough to get by. It’s a condition just short of complacency for most, though some move quickly to actively disengaged — 17 percent of the workforce. Armed with this information how do we determine whom among candidates is serious about his work? The trick may be in developing a good sense of what it feels and sounds like to be actively engaged in meaningful work, the goal of all serious workers. Consider the answers to the following question:

 

Describe what it means to be serious about your work. 

 

Candidate A. “I’m very serious about my work. I always studied hard when in college, and arrived at work promptly at my first job. I work hard and do everything that is asked of me. I know that this job like most others is not 9-5, and I always give 110 percent. I take my work very seriously.”

 

Candidate B. “To be serious about work means growing a greater sense of the whole than just an understanding of the task at hand. I think it requires that I take responsibility for the success of the team, the individual team players, and the goals of the organization. I think when people do that, they enjoy their work more and are able to make a more valuable contribution to the organization. Encouraging those around me to their best makes me better and conditions the work with real purpose. I think that is what it means to be serious about your work.”

 

Which of these candidates has demonstrated an understanding of the meaning in being serious about one’s work? Candidate A’s answer is more common than B’s answer by 10:1. Surprised? Yet, the only modeling apparent in the answers above is in candidate B’s words. Clearly, she is prepared by the thinking that preceded them.

 

The opportunity in the work we do is prepared in us. If it truly is not in your organization, if the culture is predatory in nature, then move on. But in most organizations it is not opportunity that’s missing but the willingness to invest fully in the work we do. To make a difference is easy, just give of yourself by an internal standard, not the one by which others measure themselves. Go beyond the task to complete the job. Few do, a difference maker in successful individual effort. Everyone is gifted, but some don’t open the package.

 

For more articles in their entirety, visit the business tab on www.pennysavercommunity.com
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